Internment in Liebenau

From a new book by Peter Levitt*

Click HERE for images of the sinking of The Zamzam in 1941

The Cape Argus, 19 May, 1941
1. The Cape Argus, 19 May, 1941
The Toronto Daily Star, 19 May 1941
2. The Toronto Daily Star, 19 May 1941
The New York Times, 21 May, 1941
3. The New York Times, 21 May, 1941
The Journey to Liebenau
4. The Journey to Liebenau
Lionel Levitt
5. Lionel Levitt
Kathleen Levitt
6. Kathleen Levitt
Peter and Wendy Levitt in Liebenau
7. Peter and Wendy Levitt in Liebenau
Lionel to Peter
8. Lionel to Peter
Life in Liebenau
9. Life in Liebenau
Life in Liebenau
10. Life in Liebenau
Life in Liebenau
11. Life in Liebenau
Life in Liebenau
12. Life in Liebenau
The International YMCA
13. The International YMCA
Kathleen to Lionel
14. Kathleen to Lionel
Kathleen to Lionel
15. Kathleen to Lionel
Liebeanu in Winter
16. Liebeanu in Winter
Liebeanu in Winter
17. Liebenau in Winter
Liebeanu in Winter
18. Lieneau in Winter
The International Red Cross
19. The International Red Cross
The Red Cross Parcels
20. The Red Cross Parcels
Life in Liebenau
21. Life in Liebenau
The Children at Liebenau
22. The Children at Liebenau
Exit Passport Pictures
23. Exit Passport Pictures
The Route to Palestine
24. The Route to Palestine
To South Africa by Sunderland
25. To South Africa by Sunderland

For this true account of British and Canadian internment in Nazi Germany in WWII we have the good fortune of the late Kathleen Levitt's detailed manuscript.
The Britons and the Canadians aboard the Zamzam were in a worse predicament than the American passengers who were citizens of a neutral country and who were repatriated as soon as they set foot ashore in Europe. No such luck for the others who were separated, menfolk from the women, and then dragged unceremoniously through France and Germany to a final destination in a converted mental hospital where the women and children were interned until, through the miracle of an exchange, and after some 18 months of captivity, they were reunited with their families in various parts of the world. This story of human fortitude on the part of Peter Levitt's extraordinary mother and her group of fellow detainees, is brought out in human terms by the sensitive editing of Kathleen Levitt’s hitherto unpublished manuscript. It is impossible to read these chapters without breathing the air of those tense and surreal years. The flurries of correspondence in almost a microscopic hand to and from the camp; the narrow thread of survival ensured by the faithful Red Cross parcels; the bold attempt at civilized life; the determination to maintain the health of the children under almost impossible circumstances. All this amounts to a compelling human story that enshrines those values that ultimately proved triumphant in that gargantuan struggle for decency that, collectively, we now call WWII.

* Levitt, Peter. A Memoir on The Sinking of The Zamzam. Toronto, Lugus: 2011. $25 + 5% GST = $26.25

Order by email from studio203@distributel.net, call 416 342 9660 or place a special order at any bookstore with this information.

Handling and shipping $10 in Canada, $15 for the US, $20 for the rest of the world.